Chantilly, VA - December 5, 2003 -- This spacecraft was slated for a seventh Manned mission, Mercury 10,  with Alan B. Shepard, Jr. aboard and still bears the logo Freedom 7 II.   L. Gordon Cooper Jr. was to be the back-up.  Mercury 10 was originally planned to be the first one-day Mercury flight. This objective was later assigned to Mercury 9 and Mercury 10 then became the second one-day flight.  Due to budgetary pressures, NASA and the Mercury managers had to decide whether to undertake another flight after Cooper's planned 22 orbit Mercury 9 mission.  At the end of Cooper's flight there was enough oxygen remaining for five days, six days left until his capsule decayed from orbit, and enough attitude control propellant for another two days. Walter Williams, Alan Shepard, and others at the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) pushed for a three to six day Mercury 10 endurance mission. This would give America the manned space endurance record for the first time and cover the biological objectives of the first two Gemini missions. The Mercury 15B capsule had already been modified for long-duration flight and Shepard had the name 'Freedom 7 II' painted on the side. But the risk and work pending on Gemini, which was running late and over budget,  persuaded NASA managers not to undertake another mission unless Mercury 9 failed. The massive breakdown of nearly all systems aboard Mercury 9 convinced NASA that this was the right decision. Their risk assessment was also influenced by Martin Caidin's novel, Marooned. In the book, Mercury 10's retrorockets fail, stranding its astronaut  in orbit. He is saved by the combined efforts of NASA Gemini and Russian modified Vostok spacecraft. Such resources were not available in real life.  Astronaut Shephard was removed from flight status in October 1963 due to Meniere's syndrome. If Mercury 10 had flown, it might well have been piloted by Cooper. .Credit: Ron Sachs / CNP.(RESTRICTION: NO New York or New Jersey Newspapers or newspapers w
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Chantilly, VA - December 5, 2003 -- This spacecraft was slated for a seventh Manned mission, Mercury 10, with Alan B. Shepard, Jr. aboard and still bears the logo Freedom 7 II. L. Gordon Cooper Jr. was to be the back-up. Mercury 10 was originally planned to be the first one-day Mercury flight. This objective was later assigned to Mercury 9 and Mercury 10 then became the second one-day flight. Due to budgetary pressures, NASA and the Mercury managers had to decide whether to undertake another flight after Cooper's planned 22 orbit Mercury 9 mission. At the end of Cooper's flight there was enough oxygen remaining for five days, six days left until his capsule decayed from orbit, and enough attitude control propellant for another two days. Walter Williams, Alan Shepard, and others at the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) pushed for a three to six day Mercury 10 endurance mission. This would give America the manned space endurance record for the first time and cover the biological objectives of the first two Gemini missions. The Mercury 15B capsule had already been modified for long-duration flight and Shepard had the name 'Freedom 7 II' painted on the side. But the risk and work pending on Gemini, which was running late and over budget, persuaded NASA managers not to undertake another mission unless Mercury 9 failed. The massive breakdown of nearly all systems aboard Mercury 9 convinced NASA that this was the right decision. Their risk assessment was also influenced by Martin Caidin's novel, Marooned. In the book, Mercury 10's retrorockets fail, stranding its astronaut in orbit. He is saved by the combined efforts of NASA Gemini and Russian modified Vostok spacecraft. Such resources were not available in real life. Astronaut Shephard was removed from flight status in October 1963 due to Meniere's syndrome. If Mercury 10 had flown, it might well have been piloted by Cooper. .Credit: Ron Sachs / CNP.(RESTRICTION: NO New York or New Jersey Newspapers or newspapers w

Filename: 120503Udvar-Hazy08RS.jpg
Source: Consolidated News Photos
Date: 16 Oct 2001
Location: Chantilly Virginia United States of America
Credit: Ron Sachs - CNP
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Property Release: No
Restrictions: No New York Metro or other Newspapers within a 75 mile radius of New York City
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