Chantilly, Virginia - December 5, 2003 -- Controversial sign marking the "Enola Gay" exhibit at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center of the National Air and Space Museum.  The is a simpler version of the description of the aircraft when parts of it were on display in the National Air and Space Museum's building on the National Mall in Washington, DC in 1994 - 1995 in connection with the 50th anniversary of the first use of the atomic bomb in warfare.   The museum text about the mission read: "[Colonel Paul] Tibbets piloted the aircraft on its mission to drop an atomic bomb on Hiroshima [Japan] on August 6, 1945. That bomb and the one dropped on Nagasaki three days later destroyed much of the two cities and caused tens of thousands of deaths."  "However," the text continued, "the use of the bombs led to the immediate surrender of Japan and made unnecessary the planned invasion of the Japanese home islands. Such an invasion, especially if undertaken for both main islands, would have led to very heavy casualties among American and Allied troops and Japanese civilians and military. It was thought highly unlikely that Japan, while in a very weakened military condition, would have surrendered unconditionally without such an invasion."   The controversy concerning "did the nuclear bomb hasten the end of the war or inflict massive casualties on the Japanese civilian population ?" continues to the present time..Credit: Ron Sachs / CNP.(RESTRICTION: NO New York or New Jersey Newspapers or newspapers within a 75 mile radius of New York City)
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Chantilly, Virginia - December 5, 2003 -- Controversial sign marking the "Enola Gay" exhibit at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center of the National Air and Space Museum. The is a simpler version of the description of the aircraft when parts of it were on display in the National Air and Space Museum's building on the National Mall in Washington, DC in 1994 - 1995 in connection with the 50th anniversary of the first use of the atomic bomb in warfare. The museum text about the mission read: "[Colonel Paul] Tibbets piloted the aircraft on its mission to drop an atomic bomb on Hiroshima [Japan] on August 6, 1945. That bomb and the one dropped on Nagasaki three days later destroyed much of the two cities and caused tens of thousands of deaths." "However," the text continued, "the use of the bombs led to the immediate surrender of Japan and made unnecessary the planned invasion of the Japanese home islands. Such an invasion, especially if undertaken for both main islands, would have led to very heavy casualties among American and Allied troops and Japanese civilians and military. It was thought highly unlikely that Japan, while in a very weakened military condition, would have surrendered unconditionally without such an invasion." The controversy concerning "did the nuclear bomb hasten the end of the war or inflict massive casualties on the Japanese civilian population ?" continues to the present time..Credit: Ron Sachs / CNP.(RESTRICTION: NO New York or New Jersey Newspapers or newspapers within a 75 mile radius of New York City)

Filename: 120503Udvar-Hazy03RS.jpg
Source: Consolidated News Photos
Date: 17 Oct 2001
Location: Chantilly Virginia United States of America
Credit: Ron Sachs - CNP
Copyright:
Model Release: No
Property Release: No
Restrictions: No New York Metro or other Newspapers within a 75 mile radius of New York City
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