The XV-15 tilt rotor aircraft took its place in what could be called "aviation's hall of fame," when NASA and the U.S. Army transferred the vehicle to the National Air and Space Museum's new Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center near Washington Dulles International Airport in Herndon, Virginia on September 16, 2003.  Tilt rotors are a unique type of aircraft that possess the take-off, hover and landing capabilities of a conventional helicopter with the range and speed of a turboprop aircraft.  Tilt rotor flight research began in the 1950s with the Bell XV-3 convertiplane.  NASA's Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif., in partnership with the U.S. Army, developed design specifications for a new aircraft to demonstrate the viability of the tilt rotor concept.  After extensive ground, wind tunnel and simulator tests at Ames, the first of two XV-15s, built by Bell Helicopter Textron, took its maiden flight on May 3, 1977.  The success of the XV-15 has led to the development of the V-22 Osprey and the world's first civil tilt rotor, the nine-passenger Bell Agusta 609, now under development and scheduled for deliveries in 2007.  The National Air and Space Museum, comprised of the Udvar-Hazy Center, which is scheduled to open to the public on December 15, 2003, and the museum's building on the National Mall, .will be the largest air-and-space-museum complex in the world. .Credit: Ron Sachs / CNP
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The XV-15 tilt rotor aircraft took its place in what could be called "aviation's hall of fame," when NASA and the U.S. Army transferred the vehicle to the National Air and Space Museum's new Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center near Washington Dulles International Airport in Herndon, Virginia on September 16, 2003. Tilt rotors are a unique type of aircraft that possess the take-off, hover and landing capabilities of a conventional helicopter with the range and speed of a turboprop aircraft. Tilt rotor flight research began in the 1950s with the Bell XV-3 convertiplane. NASA's Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif., in partnership with the U.S. Army, developed design specifications for a new aircraft to demonstrate the viability of the tilt rotor concept. After extensive ground, wind tunnel and simulator tests at Ames, the first of two XV-15s, built by Bell Helicopter Textron, took its maiden flight on May 3, 1977. The success of the XV-15 has led to the development of the V-22 Osprey and the world's first civil tilt rotor, the nine-passenger Bell Agusta 609, now under development and scheduled for deliveries in 2007. The National Air and Space Museum, comprised of the Udvar-Hazy Center, which is scheduled to open to the public on December 15, 2003, and the museum's building on the National Mall, .will be the largest air-and-space-museum complex in the world. .Credit: Ron Sachs / CNP

Filename: 091603Tilt_Plane04RS.jpg
Source: Consolidated News Photos
Date: 16 Sep 2003
Location: Herndon Virginia United States of America
Credit: Ron Sachs - CNP
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