The Boeing YB-52 was the second prototype B-52 aircraft built and was virtually identical to the XB-52.  The YB-52 was initially ordered as the second XB-52, but various changes incorporated into the aircraft on the assembly line warranted a designation change. The aircraft was completed and rolled out for ground testing on 15 March 1952. The first flight of the YB-52 was one month later on 15 April. The XB-52 wings had been damaged during its ground test phase, so the YB-52 was the first B-52-type to fly.  Flight testing of the YB-52 (and XB-52 starting 2 October 1952) showed the aircraft to be very fast for its size. In fact, in early September 1954, the YB-52 made a speed run from the Boeing facilities in Seattle, Washington to Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio averaging nearly 625 mph.   General Curtis LeMay, Commander of the Strategic Air Command, was eager to get the B-52 into production; however, he was strongly opposed to the tandem seating of the pilot and copilot and essentially insisted that the flightdeck be redesigned. Boeing designers did just that and changed the entire forward fuselage so the flight crew were seated side-by-side. All production B-52s beginning with the -A model had the new design, only the two prototype aircraft had the B-47 style tandem canopy.  The YB-52 was eventually retired in the late 1950s to the United States Air Force (USAF) Museum. The aircraft was scrapped in the mid-1960s in a drive (non-USAF/USAF Museum) to get rid of excess military hardware. .Credit: U.S. Air Force via CNP
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The Boeing YB-52 was the second prototype B-52 aircraft built and was virtually identical to the XB-52. The YB-52 was initially ordered as the second XB-52, but various changes incorporated into the aircraft on the assembly line warranted a designation change. The aircraft was completed and rolled out for ground testing on 15 March 1952. The first flight of the YB-52 was one month later on 15 April. The XB-52 wings had been damaged during its ground test phase, so the YB-52 was the first B-52-type to fly. Flight testing of the YB-52 (and XB-52 starting 2 October 1952) showed the aircraft to be very fast for its size. In fact, in early September 1954, the YB-52 made a speed run from the Boeing facilities in Seattle, Washington to Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio averaging nearly 625 mph. General Curtis LeMay, Commander of the Strategic Air Command, was eager to get the B-52 into production; however, he was strongly opposed to the tandem seating of the pilot and copilot and essentially insisted that the flightdeck be redesigned. Boeing designers did just that and changed the entire forward fuselage so the flight crew were seated side-by-side. All production B-52s beginning with the -A model had the new design, only the two prototype aircraft had the B-47 style tandem canopy. The YB-52 was eventually retired in the late 1950s to the United States Air Force (USAF) Museum. The aircraft was scrapped in the mid-1960s in a drive (non-USAF/USAF Museum) to get rid of excess military hardware. .Credit: U.S. Air Force via CNP

Filename: 031313USAF-History032.jpg
Source: Consolidated News Photos
Date: 28 Aug 2002
Location: United States of America
Credit: U.S. Air Force via CNP
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